PhD Programme in Management - University of Rome Tor Vergata, School of Economics, Department of Management and Law

Closing time is July 15, 2020 (4pm CEST)

The applications to the a.y. 2020/21 of the programme are open. Closing time is July 15, 2020 (4pm CEST). Full scholarships are available.
The international PhD in Management is composed of three tracks, namely Banking & Finance, Business Management & Accounting, and Public Management & Governance. For additional, detailed information about the research methodology structure, and how to apply, please visit the PhD website: https://economia.uniroma2.it/phd/management

Dynamic Capabilities: New Ideas, Microfoundations, and Criticism

Special Issue Journal of Management & Organization Call for Papers 2021. Submission Deadline for the Special Issue: 30th January 2021.

Background to the Special Issue
The dynamic capabilities framework “was created with an ambitious agenda in mind, namely, to provide a general framework to help scholars and practitioners understand the foundations of firm- level competitive advantage and associated enterprise value creation and maintenance” (Teece 2014, p. 328). We have seen much progress to come closer to this vision including a healthy and critical debate on the theoretical underpinnings of dynamic capabilities, their microfoundations, their measurement and policy implications.
In this special issue, we call for papers of conceptual or empirical nature that advance our thinking on dynamic capabilities. We invite research that tackles pertinent issues in relation to the theoretical underpinnings of dynamic capabilities and their microfoundations. One of these theoretical issues has been triggered by DiStefano, Peteraf, and Verona (2010) with their bibliometric analysis that revealed a divide of the intellectual camps around Teece and Eisenhardt discussing dynamic capabilities (see also Peteraf, DiStefano, Verona, 2013; Arndt and Pierce, 2018). We need to better understand and show the empirical implications of their findings.

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Other recent contributions to the dynamic capabilities literature have applied a microfoundations approach (Hallberg & Felin, 2020; Kurtmollaiev, 2020), linking explanatory mechanisms at the micro- level to macro-level organizational processes and outcomes (Barney & Felin, 2013; Devinney, 2013; Felin et al., 2012, 2013; Foss & Pedersen, 2016). In the context of dynamic capabilities, a microfoundational approach would involve unpacking the processes by which dynamic capabilities are created, expressed and transformed within organizations. What is the role of dynamic managerial capabilities in this context (Adner and Helfat, 2003)? We are in need of innovative empirical approaches to tackle these issues.
There is a dearth of research outlining the policy implications of dynamic capability research. With the exception of work by Teece and Helfat and co-authors, there are few inquiries showing the value capturing potential of dynamic capabilities (Teece, 2018; Helfat and Raubitschek, 2018) and their implications for anti-trust (Sidak and Teece, 2009). We attest that there is more room for inquiries exploring these themes.
The dynamic capabilities framework has received criticism and in particular regarding the clarity of its main constructs (Kurtmollaiev, 2020) as well as the difficulty of specifying initial conditions (Hallberg & Felin, 2020). As recent contribution to this ongoing conversation illustrate, the multi-level and dynamic nature of phenomena the dynamic capabilities framework seeks to explain has been insufficiently acknowledged. Possibly, work from specific dynamic capabilities such as absorptive capacity or ambidexterity could help closing these gaps.

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6th International Conference on Management and Organization

INTEGRATING ORGANIZATIONAL RESEARCH: INDIVIDUAL, TEAM, ORGANIZATIONAL, AND MULTILEVEL PERSPECTIVES

SINGLE- AND CROSS-LEVEL ORGANIZATIONAL RESEARCH: THEORY, METHOD AND PRACTICE

We are witnessing an ever-increasing amount of multilevel research in organizational studies that integrates delineated research domains and offers new lenses for understanding business practice. The purpose and scope of this conference is to identify, discuss, and grapple with single- and cross-level theory, research and method issues in order to make substantive progress in our understanding of the multilevel nature of organizations. 

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We strive to provide much-needed synthesis of underlying theories and methodological approaches within the loosely coupled community of organizational scholars by taking account of the fact that micro phenomena are embedded in macro contexts, and macro phenomena often emerge through the interaction and dynamics of lower-level elements. Such an approach may add depth and richness to our theoretical reasoning and likewise improve conversations between researchers and practitioners by providing insightful details concerning how organizations operate and behave.

https://sam-d.si/en/konferenca/6th-international-conference-on-management-and-organization/

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CALL FOR PAPERS

JOINING CONVERSATIONS IN THE SOCIETY ON MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATIONS

When a manuscript is submitted to Academy of Management Journal (AMJ), editors and reviewers frequently ask: Does the study define a new conversation (theory/lens/paradigm) or divert an existing conversation into a meaningfully different area? Conversations about management and organizations are regularly taking place outside the field of management and its journals as well. Those outside of our field and academic halls may conceptualize organizations and management differently, emphasize organizational and managerial characteristics that are relevant to them, and focus on problems that have not received attention in our studies.

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The objective of this Special Research Forum (SRF) is to encourage AMJ authors to join conversations on management and organizations that are taking place in societies around the world. Specifically, we would like to publish a collection of outstanding empirical studies that (1) contribute to the solutions of contemporary managerial and organizational problems and (2) introduce topics to AMJ readers that are seen as important outside of our field but are understudied by management scholars. Examples of such topics include the effects of caste systems on employment, discrimination, socioeconomic status and class in organizations, sexual harassment, diversity and inclusion in the workplace, organizational values, labor strikes, artificial intelligence, global health inequities, the movement of workforce across borders, bribery, political influence, private politics, transnational organizations, interconnected economic systems, and the organizational implications of national conflicts, wars, and international trade agreements and sanctions. Consistent with AMJ’s mission, we seek to publish original, insightful, interesting, important, and theoretically bold studies that employ qualitative, quantitative, field, laboratory, meta-analytic, mixed, or other empirical methods. In addition to making strong empirical and theoretical contributions, submissions to the SRF are expected to explain how practitioners may help solve problems related to the research. In other words, authors are asked to shift their discussions from the traditional practical implications of their studies to proposing solutions to the underlying problems. It is our hope that this SRF will attract research that goes beyond interestingness and takes on the difficult task of settling current debates in the society by developing new theories, applying existing theories to new problems, collecting and analyzing relevant data, and reporting credible findings. TIMELINE AND SUBMISSION Submissions are due between November 1 and November 30, 2020. Contributors should follow the directions for manuscript submission described in “Information for Contributors” in the front of each issue of AMJ and on AMJ's Contributor Information Page: http://aom.org/Publications/AMJ/Information-for-Contributors.aspx. Submitted manuscripts will be handled by the incoming editorial team of AMJ. The members of the team are: Laszlo Tihanyi (Editor elect); Katherine DeCelles and Jennifer Howard-Grenville (Deputy Editors); and Andrew Carton, Amanda Cowen, Ilya Cuypers, Luis Diestre, Lindred Greer, Denis Grégoire, Ivona Hideg, Bart de Jong, Andrew Knight, Cindy Muir (Zapata), Andrew Nelson, Floor Rink, Matthew Semadeni, Marco Tortoriello, Elizabeth Umphress, Gurneeta Vasudeva, Heather Vough, Ingo Weller, Daphne W. Yiu, and Tammar B. Zilber (Associate Editors). For queries about the submission process, please contact AMJ's Senior Managing Editor, Michael Malgrande, at mmalgrande@aom.org.

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An Integrate Approach To COVID-19 Crisis

This is a call for a special issue related to COVID-19.
LEARNINGS FROM INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE SYSTEMS
Global concern

The United Nations, governments, and health authorities all over the world are concerned that indigenous people are facing a crisis situation due to the breakout of COVID-19 due to underlying conditions faced by their communities such as poor access to healthcare, lack of testing, soap and water and inadequate communication due to inability to access information coming from a medium they are unfamiliar with.

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In addition, the capacity of emergency and health services to travel back and forth to indigenous communities is restricted by quarantine and social distancing measures. Their resilience is affected further as more than 50% of adult first-nations (indigenous) people are reported to be living with major chronic diseases.

The implications of COVID-19 for our already-under-pressure emergency services are quite significant. As the pandemic grows, there will be greater pressure on the emergency first responders to respond appropriately and safely to help all types of communities including indigenous communities. Workforce wellbeing and resilience support continues to remain a neglected management priority given the operational focus of these services, something which is vital in dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic. For example, within the healthcare workers in the UK, staff sickness is highest amongst ambulance staff. It is also well documented that cases of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other stress-related illness in emergency workers are widespread and on the rise.

While guiding indigenous communities, there is a growing concern among nations with such communities to protect the keepers of indigenous knowledge, their spiritual rituals, techniques, symbols and their stories which have served as a backbone to these communities to exist and survive. Several measures are being taken to help indigenous communities to face the consequences of COVID-19. For instance, advisory groups are being set up by governments and NGOs to help these communities by providing culturally appropriate safety practices and advice.

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Special Issue – Journal of Business Research

Special Issue – “Dark side of business-to-business (B2B) relationships” Call for Papers Revised Deadline: 30 June, 2020

The United Nations, governments, and health authorities all over the world are concerned that indigenous people are facing a crisis situation due to the breakout of COVID-19 due to underlying conditions faced by their communities such as poor access to healthcare, lack of testing, soap and water and inadequate communication due to inability to access information coming from a medium they are unfamiliar with.

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Introduction
Research on the dark side of B2B relationship has attracted significant scholarly attention in the last two decades (Anderson & Jap, 2005; Mooi & Frambach, 2012). The scholarly interest arises from the theoretical and practical importance of this area of research. While theorists seek to understand the processes underlying the dark side phenomena, managers are interested in solutions to contain the negative effects arising from the dark side. A recent special issue of Industrial Marketing Management in 2016 highlights the importance of this area of enquiry (Abosag, Yen, & Barnes, 2016). Notwithstanding these considerable efforts by scholars in recent years, several gaps remain, which need to be addressed so that a more complete understanding of the dark side phenomena and associated processes can be obtained. The purpose of this special issue is to focus scholarly attention on specific areas that need further enquiry in order to continue to develop this important stream of research.

Additional Information can be found here.

Adapting Quickly to Teaching Online

UPCOMING FREE WEBINAR
8:00 AM ET & 12:00 PM ET Thursday March 19, 2020

Whether it’s school closures or travel restrictions, the impact of the coronavirus has been felt in our industry. Many have turned to online teaching as a way to continue classes. In response, we’ve decided to hold a special 1 hour, free webinar to address your immediate needs. We are holding this webinar at two different times to best accommodate your time zone.

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In addition, the capacity of emergency and health services to travel back and forth to indigenous communities is restricted by quarantine and social distancing measures. Their resilience is affected further as more than 50% of adult first-nations (indigenous) people are reported to be living with major chronic diseases.

The implications of COVID-19 for our already-under-pressure emergency services are quite significant. As the pandemic grows, there will be greater pressure on the emergency first responders to respond appropriately and safely to help all types of communities including indigenous communities. Workforce wellbeing and resilience support continues to remain a neglected management priority given the operational focus of these services, something which is vital in dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic. For example, within the healthcare workers in the UK, staff sickness is highest amongst ambulance staff. It is also well documented that cases of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other stress-related illness in emergency workers are widespread and on the rise.

While guiding indigenous communities, there is a growing concern among nations with such communities to protect the keepers of indigenous knowledge, their spiritual rituals, techniques, symbols and their stories which have served as a backbone to these communities to exist and survive. Several measures are being taken to help indigenous communities to face the consequences of COVID-19. For instance, advisory groups are being set up by governments and NGOs to help these communities by providing culturally appropriate safety practices and advice.